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Correction to: Global terrain classification using 280 m DEMs: segmentation, clustering, and reclassification

  • Junko Iwahashi1Email author,
  • Izumi Kamiya2,
  • Masashi Matsuoka3 and
  • Dai Yamazaki4
Progress in Earth and Planetary Science20185:13

https://doi.org/10.1186/s40645-018-0173-x

Published: 23 February 2018

The original article was published in Progress in Earth and Planetary Science 2018 5:1

Correction

In the publication of this article (Iwahashi et al. 2018), there was an error in Table 3 in terrain group 10, 11 and 12.
Table 3

CRa and SCb of geomorphological and geological units for each terrain group in Japan

Terrain group

Landform element of JEGM

Geological unit of SDGM

1a

Mountain (84%), volcanoc (8%), others (8%)

Accretionary complex (30%), mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (20%), plutonic rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (13%), felsic volcanic rocks (9%), metamorphic rocks (9%) (× 2.3), others (19%)

1b

Mountain (53%), volcano (32%) (× 7.0), volcanic footslope (9%), others (6%)

Mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (39%) (× 3.1), accretionary complex (13%), Plutonic rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (10%), sediments (8%), felsic volcanic rocks (7%), pyroclastic flow deposits (6%)

2a

Mountain (79%), others (21%)

Accretionary complex (25%), mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (18%), plutonic rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (13%), sediments (13%), felsic volcanic rocks (12%), sedimentary rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (7%), metamorphic rocks (6%), others (6%)

2b

Mountain (70%), hill (9%), volcano (7%), others (14%)

Sediments (23%), accretionary complex (22%), mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (17%), sedimentary rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (13%) (× 2.3), felsic volcanic rocks (9%), plutonic rocks (6%), others (10%)

3a

Mountain (36%), hill (23%), gravelly terrace (11%), valley bottom lowland (10%) (× 2.0), volcanic footslope (5%), others (15%)

Sediments (38%), accretionary complex (13%), Plutonic rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (12%), mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (9%), pyroclastic flow deposits (8%), sedimentary rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (7%), felsic volcanic rocks (7%), others (6%)

3b

Hill (32%) (×  3.1), mountain (20%), gravelly terrace (10%), volcanic footslope (9%), valley bottom lowland (8%), terrace covered with volcanic ash soil (6%), volcanic hill (6%) (× 2.4), others (9%)

Sediments (54%), pyroclastic flow deposits (13%) (× 2.3), accretionary complex (7%), sedimentary rocks (Silurian to Middle Miocene) (7%), mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (5%), others (14%)

4

Volcano (55%) (× 12.5), volcanic footslope (36%) (× 7.7), others (9%)

Mafic volcanic rocks (Holocene) (47%) (× 84.3), volcanic debris (Miocene to Holocene) (21%) (× 12.6), mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (16%), pyroclastic flow deposits (8%), others (8%)

5

Volcanic footslope (60%) (× 12.8), gravelly terrace (10%), terrace covered with volcanic ash soil (9%) (× 2.3), volcano (6%), others (15%)

Sediments (35%), volcanic debris (Miocene to Holocene) (23%) (× 13.9), pyroclastic flow deposits (18%) (×  3.1), mafic volcanic rocks (Holocene) (14%) (×  25.8), mafic volcanic rocks (Jurassic to Pleistocene) (7%), others (3%)

6

Terrace covered with volcanic ash soil (19%) (× 4.8), gravelly terrace (16%) (× 2.4), valley bottom lowland (14%) (× 3.0), hill (12%), volcanic footslope (7%), back marsh (7%) (× 2.5), alluvial fan (7%) (× 2.3), delta and coastal lowland (5%) (× 3.1), others (13%)

Sediments (79%) (× 2.3), pyroclastic flow deposits (8%), others (13%)

7

Gravelly terrace (29%) (× 4.2), terrace covered with volcanic ash soil (14%) (× 3.5), hill (13%), alluvial fan (12%) (× 4.3), valley bottom lowland (10%) (× 2.2), volcanic footslope (8%), others (14%)

Sediments (81%) (× 2.4), pyroclastic flow deposits (5%), others (14%)

8

Terrace covered with volcanic ash soil (19%) (× 4.8), alluvial fan (16%) (× 5.7), gravelly terrace (15%) (× 2.2), back marsh (14%) (× 5.2), delta and coastal lowland (8%) (× 4.7), others (28%)

Sediments (95%) (× 2.8), others (5%)

9

Alluvial fan (30%) (× 10.5), gravelly terrace (30%) (× 4.4), terrace covered with volcanic ash soil (16%) (× 4.1), volcanic footslope (10%) (× 2.1), others (14%)

Sediments (86%) (× 2.5), pyroclastic flow deposits (5%), others (9%)

10

Back marsh (28%) (× 9.9), alluvial fan (22%) (× 7.5), delta and coastal lowland (14%) (× 8.3), gravelly terrace (8%), natural levee (7%) (× 11.2), others (21%)

Sediments (99%) (× 2.9), others (1%)

11

Back marsh (36%) (× 13.1), delta and coastal lowland (18%) (× 10.9), alluvial fan (12%) (× 4.3), natural levee (11%) (× 17.1), reclaimed land (6%) (× 13.3), others (17%)

Sediments (100%) (× 2.9)

12

Back marsh (56%) (× 20.0), delta and coastal lowland (21%) (× 13.0), natural levee (14%) (× 21.0), reclaimed land (7%) (× 14.7), others (2%)

Sediments (100%) (× 2.9)

Legends with CR of 5% or more are shown. Clusters with SC over × 2.0 are shown in bold text and the factors are in parentheses

aComposition ratio

bspecialization coefficient

climited to Holocene volcano in JEGM

The error: “natural level”.

Should instead read: “natural levee”.

This has now been updated in the original article (Iwahashi et al. 2018).

Notes

Declarations

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Geospatial Information Authority of Japan, Geography and Crustal Dynamics Research Center, Tsukuba, Japan
(2)
Japan Digital Road Map Association, Tokyo, Japan
(3)
Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku Yokohama, Japan
(4)
Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

Reference

  1. Iwahashi J, Kamiya I, Matsuoka M et al (2018) Global terrain classification using 280 m DEMs: segmentation, clustering, and reclassification. Prog Earth Planet Sci 5:1 https://doi.org/10.1186/s40645-017-0157-2 View ArticleGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s). 2018

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