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Fig. 1 | Progress in Earth and Planetary Science

Fig. 1

From: Melting relations in the Fe–S–Si system at high pressure and temperature: implications for the planetary core

Fig. 1

Typical examples of diffraction patterns of the Fe–S–Si system. a Diffraction patterns of the Fe–S–Si system at 42.2–44 GPa (Run FESSI20). A at 44(3) GPa and 1450(50) K, B at 44(4) GPa and 1650(50) K, C at 44(4) GPa and 1730(50) K, and D at 42.2(0.3) GPa and 300 K after quenching from 1730 K. NaCl was used as the pressure medium and thermal insulator. The X-ray diffraction pattern of Fe3S and hcp-FeSi alloy disappeared at 1730 K due to the partial melting of samples. The X-ray diffraction peaks of Fe3S reappeared after quenching. Abbreviations: NaCl B2 B2 phase of NaCl, FeSi hcp hcp-phase of Fe–Si alloy, FeSi fcc fcc-phase of Fe–Si alloy, Fe 3 S Fe3S phase. The 2D images of the same diffraction profiles are given in Additional file 1: Figure S1(a). b Typical example of diffraction patterns of the Fe–S–Si system at 49.2–58 GPa (FESSI10). A at 58(5) GPa and 1650(50) K, B at 54(4) GPa and 1810(50) K, C at 54(4) GPa and 1840(50) K, and D at 49.2(0.6) GPa and 300 K after quench from 1840 K. The X-ray diffraction pattern of Fe3S disappeared at 1840 K due to partial melting of the sample. The X-ray diffraction pattern of Fe3S and fcc-FeSi alloy reappeared after quenching. Abbreviations are the same as those of Fig. 1a. The 2D images of the same diffraction profiles are given in (Additional file 1: Figure S1(b))

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